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SENATE DOCKET, NO. 1488         FILED ON: 1/21/2011

SENATE  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  No. 772

 

The Commonwealth of Massachusetts

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PRESENTED BY:

James B. Eldridge

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To the Honorable Senate and House of Representatives of the Commonwealth of Massachusetts in General
              Court assembled:

              The undersigned legislators and/or citizens respectfully petition for the adoption of the accompanying resolution:

Resolutions restoring free speech.

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PETITION OF:

 

Name:

District/Address:

James B. Eldridge

 

Daniel A. Wolf

 

Stanley C. Rosenberg

Hampshire and Franklin

Katherine M. Clark

Middlesex and Essex

James J. O'Day

14th Worcester

Timothy R. Madden

Barnstable, Dukes and Nantucket

Jonathan Hecht

29th Middlesex

Kay Khan

11th Middlesex

William Smitty Pignatelli

4th Berkshire

Cleon H. Turner

1st Barnstable

Paul W. Mark

2nd Berkshire

Peter V. Kocot

1st Hampshire

Sarah K. Peake

4th Barnstable

Cory Atkins

14th Middlesex

Benjamin B. Downing

Berkshire, Hampshire, and Franklin

Charles A. Murphy

21st Middlesex

James Arciero

2nd Middlesex

Sonia Chang-Diaz

 

Sal N. DiDomenico

Middlesex, Suffolk, and Essex

Eileen M. Donoghue

 

Tricia Farley-Bouvier

3rd Berkshire

Denise Andrews

2nd Franklin

Linda Campbell

15th Essex

Thomas M. McGee

Third Essex and Middlesex

Brian A. Joyce

Norfolk, Bristol, and Plymouth

John F. Keenan

 


SENATE DOCKET, NO. 1488        FILED ON: 1/21/2011

SENATE  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  .  No. 772

By Mr. Eldridge, a petition (accompanied by resolution, Senate, No. 772) of James B. Eldridge, Daniel A. Wolf, Stanley C. Rosenberg, Katherine M. Clark and other members of the General Court memoralizing the Congress of the United States to restore free speech.  The Judiciary.


The Commonwealth of Massachusetts
 

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In the Year Two Thousand Eleven

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Resolutions restoring free speech.

 

              the First Amendment to the United States Constitution was designed to protect the free speech rights of people, not corporations;

              WHEREAS, for the past three decades, a divided United States Supreme Court has transformed the First Amendment into a powerful tool for corporations seeking to evade and invalidate democratically-enacted reforms;

              WHEREAS, this corporate takeover of the First Amendment has reached its extreme conclusion in the United States Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Citizens United v. FEC;

              WHEREAS, the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United v. FEC overturned longstanding precedent prohibiting corporations from spending their general treasury funds in our elections;

              WHEREAS, the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United v. FEC will now unleash a torrent of corporate money in our political process unmatched by any campaign expenditure totals in United States history;

              WHEREAS, the United States Supreme Court’s ruling in Citizens United v. FEC presents a serious and direct threat to our democracy;

              WHEREAS, the people of the United States have previously used the constitutional amendment process to correct those egregiously wrong decisions of the United States Supreme Court that go to the heart of our democracy and self-government;

              Now be it resolved that the Commonwealth of Massachusetts hereby calls upon the United States Congress to pass and send to the states for ratification a constitutional amendment to restore the First Amendment and fair elections to the people.

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